Watch: The most important moments from President Trump’s first day in office

The most consequential day of the Trump administration, which also included a rollback of Obamacare and an aggressive push for a border wall, came when Trump took to Twitter on Thursday afternoon to announce that the White House had issued a nationwide ban on all “illegal alien” entry into the United States.

“I have just issued a proclamation to prevent all illegal aliens from entering the United State until such time as the President issues an executive order on the subject,” Trump tweeted, which is likely to set off a firestorm of legal arguments.

But the proclamation itself is a bit more vague.

The proclamation is still available for viewing at the Whitehouse.gov website, and Trump has not said whether he will implement the order himself.

“As you may have heard, the president issued an executive action today on the border,” the proclamation reads.

“This executive order is not intended to restrict immigration from any nation, country, or region.

The president’s tweet is not entirely surprising: He has been vocal in his opposition to illegal immigration, and his order essentially bans all foreigners from entering, for good reason. “

The President has directed all Departments and Agencies to immediately implement the executive order.”

The president’s tweet is not entirely surprising: He has been vocal in his opposition to illegal immigration, and his order essentially bans all foreigners from entering, for good reason.

But in his own tweet on Thursday morning, Trump made clear that his order applies not only to those who are already here but also to those seeking to enter the country illegally.

“Today I am issuing a national security directive,” Trump wrote.

“It applies to ALL illegal aliens.

The tweet was also a clear sign of how much the White.gov policy has evolved since the president announced his executive order in mid-April. “

Anyone who is in the country unlawfully or seeks to reoffend will be arrested and prosecuted.”

The tweet was also a clear sign of how much the White.gov policy has evolved since the president announced his executive order in mid-April.

The administration has not provided a timeline for implementation, and the WhiteHouse.gov homepage still has no official explanation for the ban.

But that was not Trump’s only moment of confusion on Thursday.

Trump did not immediately announce a plan for border security, either.

Instead, he directed the Department of Homeland Security to develop a “deportation strategy” that would focus on people who have been convicted of felonies and on people convicted of certain crimes, including crimes against children, and he directed DHS to make that strategy public.

But as of late Thursday, it remained unclear what specific plans the White Houses plans to implement for enforcement and detention of people who are currently in the U, or to which groups they would target.

In a statement, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders told reporters that Trump will “continue to be focused on creating a secure, compassionate, and compassionate country for all people.”

She also reiterated that Trump has no plans to expand the size of the U’s population, saying the president has not yet decided whether to expand eligibility for certain visas.

“We will continue to prioritize our efforts on ensuring that every eligible American has the opportunity to be a citizen and to contribute to our society,” Sanders said.

“For example, we will continue with the president’s plan to expand temporary visas for people from countries with which the United Nations has designated countries of concern.

The president will make that decision in the coming weeks.”

Sanders added that Trump “has not made any decision on expanding the number of refugees we can accept, and will not do so until the administration has made that determination.”

In the meantime, the White house is facing a barrage of legal challenges to its policy of limiting the number and type of people allowed into the country.

The U. S. Supreme Court ruled in late April that Trump’s immigration order violated the Establishment Clause of the Constitution, which bars government officials from “denigrating any person because of his religion, color, or national origin.”

The Supreme Court also ruled in June that Trump violated the First Amendment rights of Muslims by restricting the entry of Muslims to the U for 90 days.

Last week, the U-S District Court for the District of Columbia sided with Trump by upholding his travel ban.

And in early July, the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, in San Francisco, upheld the ban, while the Supreme Court heard arguments in the case.

In both cases, Trump’s policy of barring foreigners from the U from entering is not legally distinguishable from the one he proposed in June, which was challenged by civil liberties groups.

While Trump’s proclamation does not specifically prohibit the entry into this country of foreign nationals convicted of crimes, the policy itself makes clear that it will affect a range of people.

According to the proclamation, anyone who has been convicted “of, or convicted of a felony